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How Lead Measures & Lag Measures Help Improve Productivity

Lead measures and lag measures. What are they, and how can they help improve your productivity?

Your lead measures are the specific ACTIONS you take to drive the lag measures, the RESULTS from your actions.

An easy example of this is, say you want to lose two pounds in one week.

The lead measures you choose to focus on are to move a minimum of 30-minutes and drink 32 ounces of water each day.

At the end of the week (when you step on the scale,) the lag measure tells you whether you achieved your goal or not.

Most people place their focus on the lag measure, the result in front of them.

The problem with this is, we can no longer change that number on the scale.

You’ll find the leverage is in focusing on the lead measure- the actions that determine your results.

When you do this, you’ll be more focused, effective, and productive so you can achieve success (whatever that is for you) in less time with less stress.

Opportunity vs. Distraction

Opportunity vs. distraction.

How do we discern between the two when something’s coming our way, and it looks really exciting?

The only way we can determine that is when we know what the goals are that we’re looking to achieve and the results we’re after.

We can then compare this exciting thing that’s in front of us and say this is a fantastic opportunity, but it’s a distraction in the long run.

Or we can look at and go eh, it’s definitely a distraction.

Only then, when we have clarity of goals and clarity of results that we’re looking for, do we align our choices more readily to see something that’s exciting but understand that it’s a distraction from our goals.

And see the opportunities as real opportunities; this is an opportunity, this is where I want to go, and the results of me investing my time and my resources into this activity will pull me closer to my goals.

If you’re struggling with ‘is something an opportunity,’ do I want to be doing it, or is it just a distraction? Slow down, look at your goals, the results you’re working so hard for. Will this opportunity that’s in front of you move you closer or is it 10 degrees off, and you’re going to wind up way away from where it is that you want to be?

Thermostat vs. Thermometer


Opportunity vs. distraction.

How do we discern between the two when something’s coming our way, and it looks really exciting?

The only way we can determine that is when we know what the goals are that we’re looking to achieve and the results we’re after.

We can then compare this exciting thing that’s coming our way and say this is a fantastic opportunity, but it’s a distraction in the long run.

Or we can look at and go eh, it’s definitely a distraction.

Only then, when we have clarity of goals and clarity of results that we’re looking for, do we align our choices more readily to see something that’s exciting but understand that it’s a distraction from our goals.

And see the opportunities as real opportunities; this is an opportunity, this is where I want to go, and the results of me investing my time and my resources into this activity will pull me closer to my goals.

If you’re struggling with ‘is something an opportunity,’ do I want to be doing it, or is it just a distraction? Slow down, look at your goals, the results you’re working so hard for. Will this opportunity that’s in front of you move you closer, or is it 10 degrees off, and you’re going to wind up way away from where it is that you want to be?

Doing vs. Not Doing


Doing VS. Not Doing.

Not doing something requires constant self-control.

When you want to change a behavior or habit, set and focus on a positively framed intention, NOT a negatively framed intention.

Often, when we’re working on changing behavior we want to stop, our attention is focused on what we don’t want – “I need to stop procrastinating” or “I have got to stop overeating.” This requires a significant amount of willpower and self-control.

When I’m working with clients, they can often rattle off a dozen things they don’t want yet struggle with naming precisely what they do want.

Has that ever happened to you? Here’s what I suggest:

Write your list of what you don’t want, and for each one, flip it.

Framing it positively draws you forward towards the change you want.

Framing it negatively, and there’s a resistance.

It all starts with clarity.

Values Guide Your Choices

Your vision is where you’re headed, but your values are what help get you there.

When you’re at a crossroads, if there’s a hard decision that you need to make, leaning into your values, knowing what is most important to you will help you decide. Whether you have an opportunity to take your business in a wonderful direction or if this opportunity is more of a distraction and taking you down a road where you don’t particularly want to wind up, your values will help guide you.

I recommend gaining clarity on three to five values, no more than five. There’s often a lot that might appeal to you, but they can usually go under three to five headers.

And once you have those, really look at how do you emulate those values in your life?

Where are they showing up?

Where were you stepping over them?

And where can you utilize them in creating the life that you want to live and the business that’s going to sustain that life?

I wrote a blog several months ago on values, and I’ll post it below. It has a whole list of values that you can choose from in different ways to gain clarity on them and to be able to implement them into your life.

So, I ask you, do you know your values?

And if you do, I’d love to know what they are if you’re willing to post below.